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12% Of Children Between Ages 6-19 Have Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

Does your child or teen spend house “plugged in” to an iPod? Tuning our may be doing more than irritating parents. It is estimated that almost 12 percent of all children between the ages of 6-19 have noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), according to the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association. NIHL has become a widespread and serious public health issue, which can occur at any age.

Although construction workers and military personnel are routinely exposed to excessive noise levels that cause hearing loss, recent research suggests that listening to music through an iPod or other device at certain sound levels may also be hazardous to hearing. Given that many children and adolescents spend many hours “plugged in” to their devices, some precaution should be used to prevent hearing loss.

The outer ear receives sound waves and funnels them down the ear canal to the eardrum and then to the inner ear. In the inner ear is a snail-shell-like organ, called the cochlea. Inside of the cochlea, there are thousands of hair cells which are actually responsible for our hearing because they transmit sounds up to the brain. Scientists believe that NIHL damages hair cells in the inner ear, causing loss of the ability to transmit sound. NIHL is gradual and painless, but eventually is permanent. Once damaged, the tiny hair cells in the inner ear cannot grow back.

Sound is measured in decibels. For example, normal conversation speech is typically measured at 60 decibels; hair dryers and lawnmowers are 90 decibels; rock concerts and car races can reach 110 decibels; and firearms and firecrackers often exceed 140 decibels. Any sound over 85 decibels is loud enough to damage your hearing. However, much like sun damage, the more intense the sound is, the shorter the amount of time you can be exposed to it before damage occurs.IQT_06-01-2012_NEWS_03_IPOD05B_t460

What can you do to prevent hearing loss?

  • Wear hearing protection: To eliminate unwanted noise, several options are available, such as ear muffs and ear plugs. Hearing protection can be custom-made or individually molded and are available through offices such as The Hearing Professionals. Putting cotton in your ears does not work.
  • Limit listening time: Take listening breaks from your iPod or other device to give your ears some recovery time.
  • Walk Away: The further you are from the noise, the less damage it will cause.
  • Turn down the volume: A simple rule of thumb is, if a person wearing earphones cannot hear what you’re saying, the volume is up too loud.

In general, the standard ear-bud-style headphones that come with your iPod are slightly louder than the over-the-counter-style headphones. For additional information about the prevention of hearing loss, visit or call The Hearing Professionals today!

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About Adam Bernstein

Adam Bernstein is the owner of The Hearing Professionals, Milwaukee's premier hearing healthcare facility. As the owner of The Hearing Professionals, Mr. Bernstein has over 20 years of experience in the hearing healthcare industry. He began his career in 1995 at GN Danavox, one of the largest hearing aid manufacturers in the world. After leaving Danavox, Mr. Bernstein opened two hearing healthcare offices in Chicago, IL. In 2001 he moved to Milwaukee, WI and opened The Hearing Professionals. In 2008 he added a second Wisconsin office in the town of Brookfield. Today The Hearing Professionals is the largest private audiology practice in SE Wisconsin. Mr. Bernstein has written numerous articles on hearing healthcare which has appeared in newspapers throughout the country and has been interviewed by news programs regarding advances in the hearing industry. Mr. Bernstein a member of Unitron’s Customer Advisory Board and a graduate of The University of Minnesota. You can email him at adam@icanhearthat.com and you can visit The Hearing Professionals at www.icanhearthat.com.

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